Beautiful Stone House For Sale In St Louis 4939 Gresham Ave 63109

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Hiking in Hickory Canyon

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I just love hiking when I can get out. I loved doing this beautiful hidden gem. This is Hickory Canyons. Located in St. Genevieve , Mo . It is a moderate hike with lots of up and downs along with many different  things to see. We went from seeing frozen icicles  to melting and cascading  waterfalls. The 1 mile hike is very unexpected in the winter months. It was a a warmer day so we  got see both. Frozen and melting. This is very active when after a rain. This is a great hike for a mile . 

Natural Features Description:
This area is botanically rich, supporting 541 native vascular plant species and 152 bryophyte (liverworts and mosses) species. A number of these species are considered glacial relicts. Glacial relicts are species that were more common in Missouri 12,000 years ago during the last Ice Age. Since then, the climate has warmed, forcing some species to inhabit micro-climates that mimic the cool, moist conditions of glacial times. Glacial relicts at Hickory Canyons include hay-scented fern, fir clubmoss and winterberry. The area is rich in fern species with over a dozen species represented.

http://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/places-go/natural-areas/hickory-canyons

Haunting’s in St. Louis It is Halloween Time

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The Lemp Mansion

The Lemp Mansion, now a restaurant and bed and breakfast, is considered among the most haunted buildings in the United States. Members of the Lemp family, each dying under tragic circumstances, remain in the mansion. William J. Lemp, founder of Lemp Brewery, purchased the mansion for his family in 1876. In 1901, William’s favorite son, Frederick Lemp, died under mysterious circumstances. Three years later, William J. Lemp, still grieving for his son, committed suicide. William J. Lemp, Jr. then became president of the Lemp Brewery and committed suicide 18 years later. His son, William Lemp III, died of a heart attack in 1943 at 42 years of age. William Jr.’s brother, Charles, also committed suicide. The ghosts of the Lemp Mansion are documented by numerous paranormal investigations.

 

We all remember the movie the “Exorcist ” this was based off it.

Alexian Brothers Hospital was originally located 3933 S. Broadway in St. Louis, MO. It has since been demolished and the hospital was rebuilt at its present location. In 1949, the exorcism that was the basis of William Peter Blatty’s novel “The Exorcist” occurred at Alexian Brothers Hospital in St. Louis, MO. The exorcism was performed on a 13-year-old boy, Robbie, whose parents brought him to St. Louis after months of dealing with the boy’s terrors. The exorcism was successful; however, when Robbie left Alexian Brothers Hospital, the room he had stayed in was permanently locked. Although the Alexian Brothers kept it secret, hospital workers involved in the case shared information about the things they heard and saw during the several-week ordeal. Notably, cold air emanated from the locked room, even though the hospital was warm everywhere else. Electrical problems plagued the surrounding rooms. After some time, the entire section of the hospital where the exorcism took place was closed. Alexian Brothers Hospital was demolished after a new hospital was built at 2645 Keokuk Street.

Alexian hospital

Zombie Road

On the bluffs above the Meramec River, there is a 2.3-mile stretch of old railroad tracks known as Zombie Road. The area surrounding Zombie Road once contained one of the largest Native American mound cities, and became a trail used by settlers crossing the country. The road was used by the Union Army during the Civil War, and last used by trucks from a quarry that closed in 1970. Zombie Road is famous for its “shadow people,” ghostly apparitions that watch the thrill seekers walking the dark trails.

http://www.paranormaltaskforce.com/zombiephotos4.html

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http://www.paranormaltaskforce.com/zombiephotos4.html

St Louis History “The Social Evil Hospital ” Found Very Interesting

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September 26, 1872 – 142 years-ago today, the Social Evil Hospital opened in St Louis. Shortly after the Civil War, the StL Police Chief estimated that there were 5,000 prostitutes working in the city, & on July 10, 1871, the St Louis City Council passed the “Social Evil” ordinance, authorizing the Board of Health to license and regulate prostitutes. It
allowed prostitution, as long as the woman worked in an established house, & didn’t market her services on the street.
In addition, she had to have a weekly medical exam. The $6 monthly fee paid for this exam went to build what became known as the Social Evils Hospital. Originally designed to hold 30 patients, it would be enlarged to have a capacity of 300, many of whom suffered from venereal disease. When the ordinance was revoked in 1874, its name was changed
to “The Female Hospital”. In the roughly three-years the ordinance was in effect, 2,052 prostitutes had been registered. Within a few months of the ordinance’s passage, many women refused to register. Some claimed the fees were too high. Others objected on the grounds that they shouldn’t be required to register for something which was their right. Within a
year, the number of registered women dwindled by 50%. In 1873, 766 women registered, of which two-thirds claimed to have become prostitutes by choice, 18% were motivated by poverty, & the remainder claimed a variety of reasons; including “seduced”, “family trouble”, “abandoned by husband” & “bad company”. Of the registered prostitutes, 14% were
married.
The Female Hospital was torn down in 1914, & is now the site of Sublette Park, Arsenal & Sublette.
The Female Hospital was the birthplace of world-famous singer/dancer Josephine Baker.

Missouri’s Natural Beauty

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Well visited one of my favorite place to go which is Pickle Springs Park in St.Genevieve Missouri which also is very close to Farmington ,Missouri. 

 Explore a geological wonderland that is a National Natural Landmark.

 View scenic waterfalls and cool box canyons that harbor unusual plants and animals.

 Enjoy the blossoms of rose azalea along the sandstone valley in the spring.

 This scenic natural area contains all sorts of fascinating sandstone rock formations including box canyons and wet weather waterfalls. The sandstone rock here is the Lamotte sandstone that was formed from sandy beaches of a shallow ocean that existed here 500 million years ago. 

Missouri has so much to offer as far as beauty of nature and wildlife. 

 

Mother Nature’s Hydraulics of Water

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This is Johnson Shut-In located in Missouri. This place is so beautiful!! great place to take a trip with the family and enjoy swimming. Play in the shallows of the East Fork of the Black River. Shoot through Mother Nature’s hydraulics in the shut-ins. Hike a trail that will show you 1.4 billion years of geologic history. Take your horse on a pretty mountain trail. Johnson’s Shut-Ins State Park is a jewel of the system, a place with something for everyone: pretty picnic areas, Ozark landscapes, natural places to swim, great campsites.

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Road Trip on Route 66 in Missouri

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On my 4th of July we took a road trip along Route 66 and it was fantastic! Here are some Memories of yesterday !So much good information on Times Beach, Coral Courts,Roadside Cafe, 66 Drive INN

Here is the History  on Times Beach It was a really big deal! Now it os a beautiful Park called Route 66 Park. Lots of Wildlife and Nature, hiking ,trails for horses etc…

Times Beach is a ghost town in St. Louis County, Missouri, Missouri, United States, located 17 miles (27 km) southwest of St. Louis and 2 mi (3 km) east of Eureka. Once home to more than two thousand people, the town was completely evacuated early in 1983 due to a dioxin scare that made national headlines. It was the largest civilian exposure to dioxin in the country’s history.

Today, the land that was once Times Beach is now Route 66 State Park. One building from the town still exists: the park’s visitor center was once a roadhouse from Times Beach’s glory days, and was the EPA’s headquarters for the area. There is a large grass mound beneath which is the debris of the demolished buildings of the former town.[2]