Hiking in Hickory Canyon

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I just love hiking when I can get out. I loved doing this beautiful hidden gem. This is Hickory Canyons. Located in St. Genevieve , Mo . It is a moderate hike with lots of up and downs along with many different  things to see. We went from seeing frozen icicles  to melting and cascading  waterfalls. The 1 mile hike is very unexpected in the winter months. It was a a warmer day so we  got see both. Frozen and melting. This is very active when after a rain. This is a great hike for a mile . 

Natural Features Description:
This area is botanically rich, supporting 541 native vascular plant species and 152 bryophyte (liverworts and mosses) species. A number of these species are considered glacial relicts. Glacial relicts are species that were more common in Missouri 12,000 years ago during the last Ice Age. Since then, the climate has warmed, forcing some species to inhabit micro-climates that mimic the cool, moist conditions of glacial times. Glacial relicts at Hickory Canyons include hay-scented fern, fir clubmoss and winterberry. The area is rich in fern species with over a dozen species represented.

http://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/places-go/natural-areas/hickory-canyons

Haunting’s in St. Louis It is Halloween Time

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The Lemp Mansion

The Lemp Mansion, now a restaurant and bed and breakfast, is considered among the most haunted buildings in the United States. Members of the Lemp family, each dying under tragic circumstances, remain in the mansion. William J. Lemp, founder of Lemp Brewery, purchased the mansion for his family in 1876. In 1901, William’s favorite son, Frederick Lemp, died under mysterious circumstances. Three years later, William J. Lemp, still grieving for his son, committed suicide. William J. Lemp, Jr. then became president of the Lemp Brewery and committed suicide 18 years later. His son, William Lemp III, died of a heart attack in 1943 at 42 years of age. William Jr.’s brother, Charles, also committed suicide. The ghosts of the Lemp Mansion are documented by numerous paranormal investigations.

 

We all remember the movie the “Exorcist ” this was based off it.

Alexian Brothers Hospital was originally located 3933 S. Broadway in St. Louis, MO. It has since been demolished and the hospital was rebuilt at its present location. In 1949, the exorcism that was the basis of William Peter Blatty’s novel “The Exorcist” occurred at Alexian Brothers Hospital in St. Louis, MO. The exorcism was performed on a 13-year-old boy, Robbie, whose parents brought him to St. Louis after months of dealing with the boy’s terrors. The exorcism was successful; however, when Robbie left Alexian Brothers Hospital, the room he had stayed in was permanently locked. Although the Alexian Brothers kept it secret, hospital workers involved in the case shared information about the things they heard and saw during the several-week ordeal. Notably, cold air emanated from the locked room, even though the hospital was warm everywhere else. Electrical problems plagued the surrounding rooms. After some time, the entire section of the hospital where the exorcism took place was closed. Alexian Brothers Hospital was demolished after a new hospital was built at 2645 Keokuk Street.

Alexian hospital

Zombie Road

On the bluffs above the Meramec River, there is a 2.3-mile stretch of old railroad tracks known as Zombie Road. The area surrounding Zombie Road once contained one of the largest Native American mound cities, and became a trail used by settlers crossing the country. The road was used by the Union Army during the Civil War, and last used by trucks from a quarry that closed in 1970. Zombie Road is famous for its “shadow people,” ghostly apparitions that watch the thrill seekers walking the dark trails.

http://www.paranormaltaskforce.com/zombiephotos4.html

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http://www.paranormaltaskforce.com/zombiephotos4.html