My Blue Jay Captures

5 Comments

The Blue Jay This common, large songbird is familiar to many people, with its perky crest; blue, white, and black plumage; and noisy calls. Blue Jays are known for their intelligence and complex social systems with tight family bonds. Their fondness for acorns is credited with helping spread oak trees after the last glacial period.is a passerine bird in the family Corvidae, native to North America. It is resident through most of eastern and central United States and southern Canada, although western populations may be migratory. It breeds in both deciduous and coniferous forests, and is common near and in residential areas. It is predominately blue with a white chest and underparts, and a blue crest. It has a black, U-shaped collar around its neck and a black border behind the crest. Sexes are similar in size and plumage, and plumage does not vary throughout the year. Four subspecies of the Blue Jay are recognized.
The Blue Jay mainly feeds on nuts and seeds such as acorns, soft fruits, arthropods, and occasionally small vertebrates. It typically gleans food from trees, shrubs, and the ground, though it sometimes hawks insects from the air. It builds an open cup nest in the branches of a tree, which both sexes participate in constructing.

 

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5 thoughts on “My Blue Jay Captures

  1. Hi,
    Beautiful photos, they are a gorgeous bird. I didn’t realize that they were different species of the Blue Jay, I love the different patterns especially the different squares so unusual, but very pretty.

  2. Pingback: Large, sturdy songbirds – Blue Jays | Wester Avenue in rural northern Wisconsin

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